Bridges to History

Welcome! We are discovering how bridges connect to excellence! Thank you for joining us today!

Studying ancient history can be quite fascinating, especially when discoveries arise during research that are bewildering. Such fascinating features surround the oldest bridges in the world.

One of the oldest bridges in the world is located in Greece, the Arkadiko Bridge. It was built around 1300-1190 BCE and mostly used for chariots and the general population.

Arkadiko Bridge. Source: Wikipedia

Another is located in Turkey, the Caravan Bridge. It was built around 850 BCE and is near where Homer lived, the writer of Iliad and Odyssey.

Caravan Bridge. Source: Wikimapia

What is amazing is that both of these bridges are still in use!

My mind begins to envision the people during those times. Keeping in mind that they lived nearly 3,000 years ago! Pondering the lives of the people building the bridges and the people watching the bridges being built. Living their everyday lives. Going to and from their destinations while crossing these bridges.

My mind then turns to present day. What will people say about us 3,000 years from today? What will they discover? Will they find that we were people striving for excellence? Will they discover writings and items identifying a people doing their best to make an impact or to just survive? Most likely, they will discover that we were presented with very similar challenges as they are, though varied.

Our Connections Challenge: What will we leave behind for our descendants to discover? How will you choose to be challenged to live a life of excellence and make an impact where you are?

To quote Maximus from Gladiator, “What we do in life echoes in eternity.”


To find out more about these and other historic bridges, visit Oldest Bridges and Arkadiko Bridge.

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